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New York City’s outdoor sports bars hit with lawsuit

A lawsuit filed against outdoor sports establishments in New York says the establishments violated a state law prohibiting gun shows and competitions.

The lawsuit, filed on Monday in Manhattan federal court, is seeking $1.6 million in compensatory and punitive damages, attorney Jonathan R. Schoenberg said.

The suit was filed by attorney Jeffrey F. Sirota, who represents the New York State Athletic Association, which has issued a directive barring outdoor sporting events and competitions from state-owned parks, including the Statue of Liberty.

The directive, which was issued on July 18, prohibits outdoor events and sports from taking place within 1,000 feet of any public place.

The plaintiffs in the lawsuit, which also seeks to have the order upheld, argue that the directive violates their constitutional rights and is a violation of the state’s public safety policy.

They allege that the ban was intended to prevent violence at outdoor sports events and that the establishments did not comply with the directive.

“This is an attempt to deny the people of New York and all Americans a constitutional right to exercise their Second Amendment rights,” said Schoenberger, who represented the plaintiffs.

“It is unconscionable that a law that is intended to protect the public from crime and terrorism is being used to protect an industry that profits off violence and the killing of innocent people.”

In July, a federal appeals court ordered New York to ban gun shows at state parks, arguing that the state constitution prohibits gun shows.

The case is one of several involving outdoor sports venues in New Jersey and Connecticut that have been hit with lawsuits since the New Year.

The lawsuit in New Brunswick is one in the state and one in Connecticut.

A number of lawsuits have been filed against bars and sports venues nationwide, including those filed in New Mexico and North Carolina.

A lawsuit brought in New Hampshire is one filed in the U.S. state.